Tuesday, May 9, 2017

A Response to Preston Yancey [Serge - Dr. Richard Poupard]

I read with interest this article in the Washington Post by Preston Yancey. It is the latest in a seemingly never-ending stream of articles claiming that those who are dedicated to oppose the intentional killing of defenseless human beings aren't really "pro-life" unless they also support (enter government program here). In his case it is opposing recent changes to the Medicaid program.

I am an oral and maxillofacial surgeon and have seen patients with rare but devastating diagnosis of craniofacial microsomia. I am very well aware of the needs that those with a very severe case of CM. My heart goes out to this family and I am very happy that they have found the care they need for precious Jack. My pro-life convictions state that every human being is valuable, regardless of any physical or mental disability. I hope that care continues and will fight to ensure that it does.

Yancey then tries to argue against the changes that have been made in medicaid. First - a point of agreement. It is not true that medicaid is for "lazy, uneducated, or selfish people". In fact, when my daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of one, we were eligible to enter into a state run program run by medicaid for her diabetic supplies (we ultimately did not - which is another story about govt for another time.) We should strive to end this ugly stereotype. I also am against the death penalty and believe that animals should be raised and slaughtered ethically. Agreement!

Then he makes his central point:

I want to believe better of the pro-life community. I want to believe they care about Jack’s long-term health and not just the fact that he was born. I want to call them pro-life, not antiabortion. But the conversations (or the silence) around health care makes us wonder.

He seems to imply that there is not waste in the system, or that some do not take unfair advantage to this and other entitlement programs. Mr. Yancey - if this is your point, you are simply wrong. We can agree that patients like Jack should be covered, but also there is a way to decrease the amount of inefficiency in the system. That way more resources go to those in need - which seems consistent with the Christian (and, of course, pro-life) ethic.

Is the current state of medicaid the best most efficient way to deliver care to those in need? You did not mention that Jack's medicaid benefits will not change (unless you get off and then back on medicaid) under the recently passed house plan. Right now 75% of the beneficiaries of medicaid are children or young adults, while they receive only 33% of medicaid funding. Is this really the best we can do?

So, you can be pro-life and not necessarily support every increase in government participation in health care. To argue otherwise is simplistic and frankly lazy. I am very glad that Jack is in this world and receiving the care he needs. Since human value does not stem from our abilities, but our image of our Creator, we should care for all in need. I also believe that we have a responsibility to do so in as efficient and effective manner as possible. It is theoretically possible that the present medicare system is the best one we can create - but that would necessitate an actual argument. We certainly did not get one here.

1 comment:

  1. Preston Yancey is confused. I oppose the intentional killing Jack now, just as I opposed intentionally killing him before his birth. There is no inconsistency.

    Mr. Yancey is simply playing semantic games with the word "life". Perhaps, this will help. When pro-lifers say they're "pro-life", they're saying that they're "pro-right-to-life". It's merely a short hand. Just consider that numerous pro-life groups are actually called something like "[State Name] Right to Life".

    What does it mean to be pro-right-to-life? It means that you believe that each innocent human being has a right not to be intentionally unjustly killed. Mr. Yancy, please read that sentence again. It has nothing to do with what unconstitional government mandates should be enforced, what fines the government should extort from people for refusing to participate, or any of that.


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